Monday, December 22, 2014

No More Words: Chrysler To Be Simply Known as FCA



Some believe that companies are living entities similar to other creatures on this planet. Certainly businesses can be fostered into valuable members of human society when properly encouraged. Like individuals, companies are also required to pay taxes in a fair civilization (although many elect to declare their residence in a civilization that results in the smallest tax bill).

Businesses can even be adored to an extent as brands and products can assemble a strong following. The automotive sector contains some of the deepest connections where people have grown all attached to a product name. The Chevrolet Corvette is envied for being a sports car embodying American performance while the Jeep Wrangler epitomizes classic utility. Even the Toyota Corolla and Honda Civic enjoy a fondness among North American motorists as trusted transportation. These types of associations are highly valued to the point even a minor change has the potential of completely ostracizing audiences. When Fiat merged with Chrysler, an instant raucous arose among United States nationalists disliking the idea that an Italian-based company would gain control one of what used to be part of the "Big Three" automakers. Heading into 2015, another change will officially take place altering the way Chrysler will be seen in a corporate sense.

Effective as of the mid-part of December, Chrysler Group will be known as FCA US L.L.C. (Limited Liability Company). An acronym for Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, FCA was introduced earlier this year as the global parent company for the newly merged operations. While the Chrysler operations is now referred to as FCA US, the Fiat S.p.A. in Italy will adopt the name FCA Italy S.p.A. (it's unclear if the Canadian subsidiary and other regions have followed suit). The new name was prominently enacted this year when FCA was listed on the New York Stock Exchange.

Though the Chrysler name remains part of the new corporate brand, it is the first time since the formation of Chrysler in 1925 that the name will not be used in full. Originally called Chrysler Corporation, a merger/buyoff affecting the organization by Daimler-Benz between 1998 to 2007 resulted in the adaptation of the name DaimlerChrysler. The auto corporation existed as Chrysler L.L.C. until the 2009 bankruptcy where it evolved to Chrysler Group.

Since the FCA US name change occurs only in the corporate realm, there does not appear to be much fallout to the change. The Chrysler brand, along with Dodge, Ram and Fiat brands, are unaffected by the use of FCA US.


No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.