Friday, November 18, 2016

EA Makes Real Attempt To Make Amends Following Real Racing 3 Update Uproar

Photo Credit: Real Racing 3/EA

Earlier this month, there was an uproar over the virtual racing app Real Racing 3 as the publisher made some controversial changes during a recent update. Many users complained on social media that aspects relating to the vehicle handling has been altered drastically. As someone who plays Real Racing 3, I concur with the comments there were noticeable changes to the driving dynamics in the game namely more aggressive brake assist and more contentious AI of competitors.

Last week, a video link was added to Real Racing 3 related to what is called the R3 Version 4.7 McLaren update.  In the message, a producer for Real Racing 3 described the changes to the game as unintentional saying it was meant to be limited to a specific component of the racing experience that leaked into updated game. Although the producer's comment on the vehicle controls has not been consistent with what is currently experienced, he did acknowledge a change in the AI. Within the video (the YouTube clip is provided below), a pledge has been made to improve the gaming controls and to make it up to Real Racing 3 players.




In my case, I immediately noticed Real Racing 3 gifted me the McLaren 675LT with a 75 percent off upgrades. Provided for me several days after a challenge concluded where the new tedious controls arguably impacted any major success, I assume the McLaren 675LT was either the mentioned apology or part of the attempts to win back favour with users.

Now the happy owner of a new McLaren supercar, handling issues are still present in the game. The brake assist option continues to be overactive with the 4.7 update. The last time I drove through the bus stop section of the Daytona International Speedway road course, the brake assist is kicking in so early and so hard that the AI competitors will promptly sail by or ram my vehicle. There were also times where in the past I could count on going nearly flat-out in some corners and make up track position. The recent update increase the braking even on 'low' setting to the point the advantage is rendered unavailable. In fact, many races I have found braking anywhere on tracks is enough where a gamer doesn't even need to apply additional brakes. The one advantage of this situation is finding out I can win some events without assists provided my tablet's touchscreen reacts to my finger.

As for the AI changes, I welcome a challenge in playing Real Racing 3. What would be nice is if the winnings at the end of an event could be adjusted to reflect the reward of victory. In the past, I would rerun some easier but well-playing events such as endurance races just so I can compile enough in-game currency to upgrade a car so I can finally complete stages.

Real Racing 3 has not been without its issues. In addition to this recent game-affecting update, the cost of completing through its 'free-to-play with in-game purchase model' (typical with many current apps) proves expensive. However, the driving simulation delivered through Real Racing 3 has remained a fun app game I continue to pick-up regularly. With a tight-lipped announcement for a new addition to the Real Racing 3 game hinted in the video, I will look forward to seeing what virtual automobile I may be driving into 2017.


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